February 2010

I'm on a plane from Vegas - after nerding out at the Digital Signage Expo.  It's a full circle, having been christened into Digital Signage around 2002 with GraybowGlasfire (3M's Vikuiti), if any of you remember.  In any event, this short 50 minute jaunt from Vegas to Burbank gives me time to write a quick blog.

Dear Avid, I’ve called this meeting today because I love you. And I want you to get help. You deserve it. We deserve it. As part of your family (albeit a lengthy alphanumeric system ID in your database), it’s my job to stick by you when the going gets tough. And tell you when you’re screwing the pooch.

I was going to dazzle you all with a post about the exiting realm of Digital Asset Management (Oooh!  Ahhh!), but I thought I would stick with the encoding kick I've been on recently. Encoding solutions are much like interns: you have no idea what they are fully capable of, you have no idea how well they can multi-task, and there sure as hell there are a lot of ‘em. Thus, we need to develop some baselines with which to judge perspective candidates.  There are several yardsticks with which to measure these by.  But which ones?  Features?  Speed?  Cost?

Last week, we covered the concept of Conditional Encoding (KCM: Kammes Compression Methodology, still looking for investors) and you may have noticed that I put an odd node on the graphic workflow.  The LOGIN.  Why?  Because the next phase of this workflow is going to piggyback on not only the Internet, but on your LAN as well.

The post industry lives and dies around the concept of deliverables.  What specifications have to met to appease the viewer, server, or engineer on the other end.  Many times, just getting the deliverable out is a chore in itself.  The last encoding format sheet I read from a leading encoding manufacturer had 5 pages of supported input / output formats. Being able to decipher these often cryptic encoding acronyms and numeric values appears to need a degree in engineering.