March 2010

Beginning the audio edit of the post production sound process requires receiving the correct files and media from the editorial facility.  I've always had my standard "list of deliverables", but over the past few years I've found that quite often the export of these files from Final Cut is not done properly.  Thus, I've created a document (as well as explanations) outlining what a sound editor might need, why, and how to do it.

Matt Stratton turned me on to Clicky Stats awhile ago, and through Clicky, I’m able to see what web searches come up with my blog as a result. I also see when these searches lead them to my blog – but then they leave because they didn’t find the answer. I thought since the search engines think I already have it on my site, perhaps I should.   Below is a sampling of the search queries (that I can decipher from cryptic keyword searches) that my website supposedly already has the answers for.

Getting Final Cut Pro projects and/or media into Avid Media Composer

On any given project, there are many editors, in many disciplines, and spread across many miles.  Therefore, getting YOUR stuff to work with THEIR stuff is imperative.  Thus, I present to you the best ways to get Final Cut Pro projects and/or media into Avid Media Composer.

Avid creates a document for us tech folk, commonly known as the Avid Cheat Sheet.  It's a "living" document with install / tech gotchas, links, and tech goodness for the new version of Media Composer.   It is absolutely essential for building, optimizing, and configuring an efficient (and sometimes even functional) Avid system.  Here is latest version for 4.0.4.