Avid

On Friday night, I had the opportunity to join the 9th annual Pre NAB editors lounge panel discussion as a last minute fill in.  I found myself uncharacteristically less participatory, mainly due to the experience and stature of the others on the panel.  The brain power on the panel could power a small town.
We've got the purple kool-aid, and we've got the firehose: New. Avid. Releases. Now that the cat is out of the bag, I can share with you dear readers a comprehensive list of what is new and groovy inside the latest offering from Avid.  Like what you see?  Join me for a more in-depth webinar on all that is contained therein plus a huge helping of bonus material on November 22nd.  More details here. Until then, let's whet your appetite, shall we?
Before we get into the nitty-gritty, let's go over some of the basics of PhraseFind. *Update April 12, 2011: Avid has given some feedback on the blog post, and I have posted their comments inline in bold.Thanks Avid! PhraseFind is a phonetic matching algorithm, developed by Nexidia. It’s been wildly successful, serving as the basis of AV3’s “Get” software, which is used in conjunction with Final Cut Pro. Avid has licensed the technology and has branded it “PhraseFind”. It is available for $495, or $1295 when bundled with ScriptSync. Additional language packs can be purchased for $149.
Kool-Aid!  Get your Kool-Aid here! Avid has unveiled the latest update to their editing suite family: Media Composer & Symphony 5.5, as well as DS 5.5.  Below are some of the biggest features to the Media Composer and Symphony 5.5 releases.
Unfortunately, we're looking at the lesser of 2 evils. No mainstream editorial platform truly understands 3D natively. Through trickery, masking, and video hide-and-seek, we can manipulate our editing platform of choice to limp along for stereoscopic editorial. I'm a firm believer in the right tool for the right job, and choosing the tool requires a fair amount of research.
Gonna mix it up a bit with this post, and go video on ya. This is trick is from a recent Key Code Media event where I discussed Media Creation & Sharing with Final Cut Studio and Avid Media Composer 5.0. (see: Avid AMA, Telestream's Pipeline, AJA's KiPro) In this demonstration, we use a Pro Res timeline in Final Cut Pro, send it to Avid without creating any new media, and have the sequence not only open, but also utilize the same media - all using Automatic Duck & Avid's AMA feature in 5.0 - via a hidden (undocumented) trick!
I've been getting massive web traffic and emails from people looking to use ProRes within Avid, as well as outputting ProRes from Avid.  With Avid Media Composer 5.0 due to be released next month, the two playing nice with one another will be paramount.  I drew up this short Q&A for fellow coworkers at Key Code Media, and I thought I'd share it here.

Getting Final Cut Pro projects and/or media into Avid Media Composer

On any given project, there are many editors, in many disciplines, and spread across many miles.  Therefore, getting YOUR stuff to work with THEIR stuff is imperative.  Thus, I present to you the best ways to get Final Cut Pro projects and/or media into Avid Media Composer.