Apple Tag

Unfortunately, we're looking at the lesser of 2 evils. No mainstream editorial platform truly understands 3D natively. Through trickery, masking, and video hide-and-seek, we can manipulate our editing platform of choice to limp along for stereoscopic editorial. I'm a firm believer in the right tool for the right job, and choosing the tool requires a fair amount of research.

On the heels of the recent uncharacteristically Apple statement about the future of Final Cut Pro, and then a fantastic post by a fellow Hollywood Tech Neighbor Philip Hodgetts, speculation has one again fanned the flames of excitement within the collective Final Cut Pro Kool-Aid drinkers.  Thus, I thought I would examine the current gaps I see in the product.  A wish list, as it were.  And no, not minor keyboard shortcuts and the like, but fundamental features which I believe are needed to kick ass and chew bubblegum.  Admittedly, many of these keep the "Pro" in "Pro Apps."

I've been getting massive web traffic and emails from people looking to use ProRes within Avid, as well as outputting ProRes from Avid.  With Avid Media Composer 5.0 due to be released next month, the two playing nice with one another will be paramount.  I drew up this short Q&A for fellow coworkers at Key Code Media, and I thought I'd share it here.

Once a year, us posties flock to our mecca, and plant ourselves within the bowels of sin city to suckle from the geek teet, and bask in all it's acronym run glory.  We spend too much on cheap food.  We spend way more on alcohol, and desperately try and find which one of the vendors will have the best afterparty.  Walking each hall and floor tenderizes our feet as if Rocky Balboa was in training.  We hoard swag in the several free branded bags slung over both shoulders.  We shout over the tens of thousands of other people asking the same questions, and demand specifications about balsawood products that won't ship until next year.  We play business card roulette and find out who is where.  We reminisce about older, bulkier and more expensive technological solutions, the same way we'll chuckle over this years offerings in 10 years.

Matt Stratton turned me on to Clicky Stats awhile ago, and through Clicky, I’m able to see what web searches come up with my blog as a result. I also see when these searches lead them to my blog – but then they leave because they didn’t find the answer. I thought since the search engines think I already have it on my site, perhaps I should.   Below is a sampling of the search queries (that I can decipher from cryptic keyword searches) that my website supposedly already has the answers for.