Tech Blog

Gonna mix it up a bit with this post, and go video on ya. This is trick is from a recent Key Code Media event where I discussed Media Creation & Sharing with Final Cut Studio and Avid Media Composer 5.0. (see: Avid AMA, Telestream's Pipeline, AJA's KiPro) In this demonstration, we use a Pro Res timeline in Final Cut Pro, send it to Avid without creating any new media, and have the sequence not only open, but also utilize the same media - all using Automatic Duck & Avid's AMA feature in 5.0 - via a hidden (undocumented) trick!
This more of a tech note than dissertation. JVC, Hyundai, Sony, Panasonic, and the like – are all coming out with 3D monitors.  And they’re all flat.  And they’re all shiny and sleek.  Other subjective features aside, many of the ones you’ve been eyeballing don’t quite cut the mustard when used in the edit bay.  Here’s why.
On the heels of the recent uncharacteristically Apple statement about the future of Final Cut Pro, and then a fantastic post by a fellow Hollywood Tech Neighbor Philip Hodgetts, speculation has one again fanned the flames of excitement within the collective Final Cut Pro Kool-Aid drinkers.  Thus, I thought I would examine the current gaps I see in the product.  A wish list, as it were.  And no, not minor keyboard shortcuts and the like, but fundamental features which I believe are needed to kick ass and chew bubblegum.  Admittedly, many of these keep the "Pro" in "Pro Apps."
I've been getting massive web traffic and emails from people looking to use ProRes within Avid, as well as outputting ProRes from Avid.  With Avid Media Composer 5.0 due to be released next month, the two playing nice with one another will be paramount.  I drew up this short Q&A for fellow coworkers at Key Code Media, and I thought I'd share it here.
I penned a tongue in cheek article for a blog post for Post Magazine, and they decided to print it.  Since I can't seem to find it on their website, I present it here: I’m actually in a very unique position. I have the privilege of meeting editors and seeing facilities which run the gamut in terms of post production. TV, film, and new media; both back in the Midwest and here in Southern California. I was able to work as both a Creative and as a companion to the Creatives. And through all of these projects, meet and greets, consultations and chats over a beer, I’ve compiled a list of things I think everyone breaking into the industry should know.